Receiving video stream from esHail2

  • Hi to everyone.

    Which tuner should I use to receive the television stream from the esHail2 satellite?

    DVB-S or DVB-S2? or both? Its analog or digital transmission? Im not a specialist with TV-Sat.

    Im also monitoring non amateur post due to receiving beacons with 80cm offset dish with Inverto LNB (PLL).

    I see beacon from this direction on 11.205 but not sure that this is EsHail2


    Regards!

  • Hi,

    for the DATV transmission a DVB-S and DVB-S2 receiver is necessary. As also DATV transmissions with reduced bandwith are to be expected, a good solution could be using Mini Tioune. Have a look here:

    https://wiki.batc.org.uk/MiniTioune


    I guess that worldwide analog transmissions via Sat are not longer available.


    If you wish to use a commercial receiver make sure that it allows symbol rates lower than 1 Mbit.

  • Hi Chris, and welcome to the Forum!

    Some more info: DVB-S2 is less demanding in terms of power than DVB-S, so we do recommend DVB-S2. Also most OMs will probably use reduced BW DVB-S2, as noted by DG8KD so the best way (IMHO) is to get a Minitioune as it is the most flexible solution on RX. You need to become BATC member to order one, but the fee is small and it's worth it.

    For non-hamradio reception, you are probably out of the main beam of Es'hail-2 so if you want to watch the regular programmes, you can go with a standard satellite receiver but probably need a big dish..


    73s Achim

  • I have ordered in CW1/19 a Minitiouner-Express board at datv-express.com and got it a few days later from Charles G4GUO but those of you who want to buy there as well just a notice Charles has at the moment no Europe stock. More should be on the way from the US soon. It works perfect with the software 0.8s from Jeanne-Pierre. I did the powering through USB3.0 for the board itself and supply the voltage for the LNB externaly.

  • The MiniTioune looks like a nice solution, but I prefer to spend my little spare time working on other things... :-)


    I recall the US HD satellite system DirecTV uses an IF of 250 - 750 MHz. To be able to use standard off-the-shelf DVB-S(2) receivers, there is a unit on the market called the BBC, B-Band Converter. This takes the DirecTV IF of 250 - 750 MHz and upconverts it to 1650 - 2150 MHz. Though I have never seen one of these in real life, let alone had one in the lab, I think chances are the LO (low side 1400 MHz?) is stable and clean enough to also allow demodulation or our lower symbol rates. The unit is power from the satellite set top box LNB connector.


    There are BBC units on Ebay and Amazon for about 10 - 20 €, but the US shipping is a whopping 25 - 40 € and on top of that there is the customs etc.


    I wonder if anyone has happened to already taken a technical look into this possiblity?


    /Michael, oh2aue

    ---

    "If you have data, you have something, if you do not, you have nothing." (Bengt Hultqvist)

  • oh2aue Michael.. first of all the Mini-Tiouner-EXPRESS ist fully assembled you only must connect your LNB and USB to PC and install the software from Jean-Pierre. So nothing happens with your spare time.


    The SUP-2400 Converter is used by HAMs as an upconverter for DATV from 70m up to 70cm. As stated in the name the LO is 2400 MHz. here is a good link how they use it.

    http://www.m0dts.co.uk/index.php?item=90

  • Heiner,


    thanks for the info, I only found photos of bares PCB's and drew the hasty and false conclusion the Mini-Tiouner it was only available as a kit (I hate having to create accounts just get basic information - grumpy old man syndrome).


    I was not aware of the SUP-2400 and it's us for DATV in DL/UK. But looking at the photos, I am pretty confident it is just fine for even pretty low symbol rates. And without any need for modification!


    /Michael, oh2aue

    ---

    "If you have data, you have something, if you do not, you have nothing." (Bengt Hultqvist)

  • I recall the US HD satellite system DirecTV uses an IF of 250 - 750 MHz. To be able to use standard off-the-shelf DVB-S(2) receivers, there is a unit on the market called the BBC, B-Band Converter. This takes the DirecTV IF of 250 - 750 MHz and upconverts it to 1650 - 2150 MHz.

    Around 1994-1995 a similar device was used in Europe to receive the new Astra 1D satellite. Until then, LNBs had a 10 GHz LO. The Astra 1D satellite started to use the 10.7-11 GHz band so the IF would start at 700 MHz and existing tuners that started at 950 MHz would not be able to cover it. Converters like the B-Band Converter were sold, I still have one in the junkbox made by Johansson. I plan to use it on Es'hail-2 for my first experiments.

    From then on, the standard LNB local oscillator frequency was changed to 9.75 GHz and the frequency coverage of tuners extended upward to 2150 MHz so those converters weren't necessary for newly installed systems.

    Except... then the band was extended on the high end and the new 9.75/10.6 switchable LNBs appeared.